Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility Integrating individuals with autism spectrum disorder into inclusive classrooms

Integrating individuals with autism spectrum disorder into inclusive classrooms

Integrating Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder Into Inclusive Classrooms

Integrating individuals with autism spectrum disorder into inclusive classrooms

Autism spectrum disorder is a neurodevelopmental disorder that involves challenges with social interaction, speech, nonverbal communication, and repetitive restricted behaviors. Difficulty moving from one activity to another.

In 1975 the Education for All Handicapped Children Act was established. The law was renamed in 1990 to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). This law changed the education system for individuals with disabilities in the United States because it guaranteed them the right to education in public schools, including individuals with autism spectrum disorder in inclusive classrooms.

What are inclusive classes?

Autism spectrum disorder can be a challenge in inclusive classrooms for students and teachers. This problem was solved in the past by separating students with disabilities in their classrooms. With the advent of the IDEA law in 1975, schools began to include students with disabilities, including in inclusive classrooms.

In inclusive classrooms, students with disabilities may receive longer instructional time. Individuals with autism spectrum disorder have fewer school absences and may achieve better post-secondary outcomes, including individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), by providing opportunities to form relationships with peers. Students with disabilities may spend 80% or more of their school time in inclusive classrooms.

Inclusive classroom teachers

General education teachers must create a safe environment so that all students can learn, They must also be fully aware of the needs of individuals with autism spectrum disorder in terms of academic, social, and Emotional. For example, General education teachers in inclusive classrooms must design plans and instructions to suit the needs of individuals with autism spectrum disorder and also ensure that all students can benefit from them. Therefore, the individualized educational plan must be developed with members of the educational team at the school.

Changes in inclusive classrooms

Physical changes to inclusive classrooms may include:

  • Change the lighting by increasing or decreasing light levels or allowing students to wear sunglasses.
  • Ambient and loud noise can be reduced by placing carpets and pillows. Providing earplugs or headphones to reduce noise.
  • Providing different types of seats, Such as rocking chairs, bean bag chairs, or seat cushions.

In the social aspect, Teachers often need to change aspects of classroom management for students with autism spectrum disorder

  • Students with autism spectrum disorder may do well with class rules in the classroom.
  • Students with autism spectrum disorder may need to rest before rejoining classroom activities.
  • Some students with autism spectrum disorder may engage in stereotyped, repetitive behaviors in order to self-soothe. like, Flapping hands or writing on paper. Therefore, teachers must have sufficient knowledge of these behaviors and allow them in order to create a safe environment for students and replace these behaviors with appropriate behaviors in order to express themselves in the classroom.
  • In some cases it may involve behavioral changes across the entire classroom. like, If the sound of applause is too loud for some students with autism spectrum disorder, the teacher can direct students to express appreciation in another way.

Teachers must take into account the basic needs and sensory issues of students with ASD to ensure all students participate and show their best in the classroom.

General education students in inclusive classrooms

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act says little about how the behavior of a student with autism spectrum disorder affects his or her classmates.

Although there are concerns that inclusive classrooms can interfere with the learning of typically developing students, As the limited research on this topic is not accurate. Therefore, students with autism spectrum disorder may benefit from students with typical development, especially in social skills, as studies have shown that students with autism spectrum disorder may gain social skills, understanding, and acceptance in inclusive classrooms. But it will take more research to determine whether the benefits to students outweigh the potential negatives.

Ref

How Autism Affects the Inclusive Classroom – Lamar University Online