Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility Training autistic children on non-verbal communication

Training autistic children on non-verbal communication

Training Autistic Children On Non-verbal Communication

Training autistic children on non-verbal communication

Co-authors of this article include Autism Speak’s Chief Science Officer, Gerry Dawson and clinical psychologist Lauren Elder.

The most common question asked by parents and specialists in the field of autism spectrum disorder is, “How can we enhance and develop non-verbal language in children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder?”

Before presenting effective strategies for nonverbal language development with individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, it is important to remember that each individual diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder is unique, so the strategies used may not be appropriate for all individuals and may differ from one child to another, even if It was used correctly, so every child diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder is able to learn to communicate, but the methods differ depending on whether the language is verbal or non-verbal. Non-speaking individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder have many skills to communicate through visual support and the activation of assistive technologies. for them.

The most important effective strategies for enhancing and developing non-verbal language in children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and training them in non-verbal communication include:

Game strategy and social interaction

Children often learn through play and social interaction, including language learning. Interactive play with children provides enjoyable opportunities to stimulate and train autistic children in non-verbal communication by giving the child a wide and diverse range of his favorite toys. Social interaction can be enhanced by singing with the child. Singing the child’s favorite songs and interacting gently while playing with him.

Therefore, when training children diagnosed with a spectrum disorder to communicate through play, sit in front of the child and try to be close to eye level so that it is easy for the child to see and hear you.

tradition

Imitating your child diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder by imitating sounds and imitating play behaviors will encourage him to imitate you, which increases communication through role-playing. But make sure the behavior you are imitating is appropriate.

Example: When the child is playing and rolling the car, roll the car as well, but if the child throws the car, do not imitate throwing the car!

Non-verbal communication

Nonverbal communication should be emphasized when training children diagnosed with ASD to communicate, as gestures and eye contact can build the foundation of language in children.

Procedures for training autistic children on non-verbal communication:

1- Exaggerate gestures and facial expressions when communicating.

2- The parent or specialist must use physical and vocal expressions when communicating.

3- Gestures that are easy for the child to imitate should be used, such as: applause, Raising the hands up.

4- The parent or specialist must respond to the child when he looks at the toy or points to it by giving the toy to the child or pointing to the toy before giving it to the child.

Example: When you say “look,” you must extend your hand to the object being pointed to. When you answer “yes,” you should nod your head.

Give the child space

Parents and specialists must leave sufficient space for the child when communicating. Therefore, it is natural for parents to feel rushed over the child’s immediate response, but it is important for the parents to be patient and give the child plenty of opportunities to communicate, even if the child is not verbal.

Example: When you ask your child a question or see him wanting something, You should pause for a few seconds while looking at it. The speed with which you respond to your child’s communicative behavior will enhance the child’s feeling of the power of communication.

The language used when communicating

The language used when training autistic children in non-verbal communication should be simple and uncomplicated in order to help your child imitate speech and follow instructions issued by you.

If the child is non-verbal, individual words must often be spoken. This is called the individual rule.

Example: When playing with a ball with your child, say “throw” or “ball.”

Note: If your child is verbal, use phrases that contain one word more than your child when talking to you.

Interests

Parents and specialists should follow the child’s interests rather than interrupting the child when speaking and using the individual rule.

How to follow the child’s interests:

You must talk to the child when he engages in his favorite games and list the actions he does.

Example: If the child is playing with a box of geometric shapes, the parents or specialist can talk to him by saying “in” when he places the shape in the correct place. You can say “shape” when he holds the shape and “throw the shape” when the child gets rid of the shapes to start the game again.

Note: You should talk to the child using vocabulary that attracts his interest, which will help him learn some of the new vocabulary associated with it.

Assistive technologies and visual supports

Assistive technologies and visual supports can replace verbal language by developing and enhancing it in children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder.

It includes assistive devices such as, The iPad and applications that contain expressive images as visual support can contain a wide range of images that the child can use to indicate and request different daily needs.

When using and choosing these strategies, parents should speak with qualified professionals to support and develop nonverbal language in children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder.

Reference:

Teaching nonverbal autistic children to talk | Autism Speaks